Germany, a dream country?


Since 2005, Germany
has become a comfortable and attractive country where
nearly 9,11 Million
foreigners
have
moved. The reasons, mostly to find a good job with nice conditions, enjoy almost
free studies and to live with your husband or wife. “I moved to Münster,
Germany, last September because my husband is from here and he works in the city
as well. In Tokyo, my home town, I have worked in finances. And now, while I am
a housekeeper, I am learning German and I will look for a job”, Karin Holthaus
from Japan affirms, talking during her German lesson, surrounded by other 15
international students: Brazil, Italy, Spain, Nigeria, UK and Lebanon. And all
of them share their reasons for moving to Germany: study, work and after being
married.

We cannot realize how many from over 17 million people
with immigrant background are here in Germany, till we are in the middle of an
international bus stop. From Spain, after Christmas Holidays, more than 35 big
buses started their trip to different points of the country at the same time.
All of them full. Last Saturday, 8th January, for example, from Galicia (north
Spain), half of a bus was with over 50 years old men coming back to their
German jobs. Surprisingly because in Spain, since the economical crisis started
-in 2008-, most of the Spanish who moved to the European potential were young
people who finished their university careers and had no work in Spain. Not any
more only the young ones.

In the same bus, in San Sebastian, a city situated 23km
from the boarder with France, one whole African family (2 adults and 5 childern)
-only the man has European nationality- came inside on their way to northern
Germany.

Why Germany is now the most attractive and popular
European country? “Well, the whole Europe is a really good place to live in:
education, health and rights. But in Germany is even more obvious. You do not
feel any fear walking along streets at night, salaries are high enough and there
are chances to live a good life”, a 64 years old Englishman realizes. “I was
living a couple of years in Istanbul, Turkey, with my husband and my little son,
and there is no way to compare how we were living there and here, in Germany. In
Turkey, we were lonely because, even if we were in Istanbul living with other
families, we were foreigners and we could not have been integrated with others
as much as we are here”, explains another student – half Spanish half
Persian.

Most of the German stereotypes could be true: they are
cooler than souther Europeans, they have stricts rules to follow; German could
be accused of being too boring and that their national gastronomy is kind of
limited. But still people choose that country as the land where they can
develop themselves. The best example is one Italian
restaurant, Moca d´oor, in Münster, where people from
Italy of course, Arabic countries, China, Peru work there… and just a few from
Germany.

 

Sabela González

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